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Year 5 blog

We’d like to say a huge congratulations to our class for a wonderful performance at the Elsecar Music Festival this morning.  Not only did they play beautifully, they also behaved impeccably too!  Well done to those talented children who were brave enough to play a solo in front of all those people. We’re proud of you all.

On Friday 23rd June, all our pupils in Year 5 (as well as children from other schools) will be performing at Elsecar Heritage Centre to showcase what they have learnt in their brass lessons this year with Mr Dodd.  It is always a really good event and we would like to invite you to come along to watch and support your children.  A letter will be going out shortly.  The performance starts at 10:30 and there is a £2.50 entry fee.  We look forward to seeing you there.

 

In Literacy, we have been studying the poem ‘Flannan Isle’ by Wilfrid Wilson Gibson; this is based on the true story of three lighthouse keepers who went missing in 1900.  We researched facts (and opinions) about their disappearance and used the information to write detailed news reports.  It was very pleasing to see the children using the key features of a news report, including using formal language and both direct and reported speech for quotes.  A selection of these will be on display in the classroom for you to read (as well as a few shown below.)

Well done to Jola Markey, who was chosen as our Mystery Writer for a fabulous news report.

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Our ‘Islands’ topic is well under way, and we have produced some amazing work linked to this! We have had many comments from other children and staff about the high quality of our two displays of puffin art and non-chronological reports. Two of the children in class were even lucky enough to visit Bempton Cliffs in the holidays to see puffins in the wild!

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One of the areas we have been learning about in science is famous naturalists and conservationists. We really enjoyed finding out about the careers of Jane Goodall and David Attenborough, and you can see what we learned about them in our display outside the classroom.

 

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We have had some excellent debates around what makes a person ‘great’ and who should be included as a ‘Great Briton’. The class voted Alexander Fleming in first place, followed by Winston Churchill in second and Stephen Hawking in third. Thanks again to everyone who contributed suggestions for us!

After reading and studying many different British legends, the children have written their own legends.   They have worked extremely hard on these, editing and improving them continuously, and I have thoroughly enjoyed reading them.  These will be made into books for others to read – I’m sure that you’ll enjoy reading them too.

Well done to our final mystery writer of the term - Layla Armitage.  Her legend was written in the correct style and she managed to interweave action, description and dialogue throughout.  Her sentence types were varied, including relative clauses and subordinate clauses, and she worked extremely hard to include a wide variety of punctuation.  Preferring to print at the beginning of the year, Layla now produces beautiful, joined-up handwriting which is lovely to see.

As Easter rapidly approaches, we will be doing a short topic (for two weeks) based around chocolate.  We will be looking at where chocolate comes from, who discovered it and how it is made.  We will also be designing and advertising our own chocolate bars.  In the afternoon of Wednesday 5th April, we will be having a chocolate workshop.

Thank you to all the family members who contributed suggestions for our ‘Greatest Britons’ debate. Winston Churchill won the adult vote, followed by Alexander Fleming and then Florence Nightingale. Over the next few weeks, we will be learning more about the people suggested, ready to hold our own vote. We’ll let you know who we choose once we’ve had our debate.

 
As part of our topic in the summer term, we will be making models of the Easter Island statues. If you have any shoe boxes, or other sturdy boxes of a similar size/ shape, please could you bring them into school for us. Thank you!

We were set the challenge of making a structure that could support the weight of a hardback book, using only cocktail sticks and midget gems. The display shows all of the successful structures.

 

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In Literacy, we have been discussing the features of myths and legends and how they differ.  Our main focus has been to study the Legend of Robin Hood.  We have two displays: one inside the classroom showing class work and one outside the classroom showing some of the wonderful homework that the children have completed.  (Click on the pictures to see a larger version that you can read.)

 

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We used different sources of evidence to find out information about Robin Hood and whether these suggested if he was real or not.  We used our information to write a report titled ‘Robin Hood – fact or fiction?’

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We looked at the features of a diary and wrote three diary entries written from the point of view of Robin Hood.

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The children wrote a detailed description of a forest setting focusing on using ambitious vocabulary and a range of figurative language.

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